21st Century Skills

The term “21st-century skills” is generally used to refer to certain core competencies such as collaboration, digital literacy, critical thinking, and problem-solving that advocates believe schools need to teach to help students thrive in today’s world. In a broader sense, however, the idea of what learning in the 21st century should look like is open to interpretation—and controversy.

This infographic by University of Phoenix details the Top 10 skills needed to succeed in the 21st Century workplace, as well as some insight on how best to acquire them. Take a look… and see if your coursework, extra-curricular activities, internships and volunteer assignments are helping you develop these must-have skills:

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Teaching with technologies

“Teachers will not be replaced by technology, but teachers who don´t use technology will be replaced by those who do”

Sheryl Nussbaum-Beach

ImageTechnology is changing education offering new resources to engage students in learning and giving them an opportunity to learn about new technological fields, leading to jobs and to a greater understanding of how these fields affect the world.

Technology can benefit learning in so many ways, for instance, it can illustrate procedures, equipment, or situations that students many not have the chance to experience firsthand. The use of gadgets stimulate learner participation because encourage students to interact with material, it extend information access, increase communication among teachers and student, provide feedback, bring the World into the Classroom and Eliminate the need for extensive photocopying and give students more access to classroom materials by managing information.

However, Technology can be used well, or it can be abused. The technology-enabled classroom offers access to information, but it also offers many more distractions. Games on devices, text messaging, email and websites all compete for students’ attention, taking that attention away from the subject on which they are supposed to be focusing.

However, Technology can be used well, or it can be abused. The technology-enabled classroom offers access to information, but it also offers many more distractions. Games on devices, text messaging, email and websites all compete for students’ attention, taking that attention away from the subject on which they are supposed to be focusing.

So, technology can be a great addition to the classroom when it is used to improve student learning and help students reach their goals. The range of technologies is great and increases every day. Of course, teachers have to evaluate the potential effectiveness of a particular technology for each course and students